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Does age or gender of the patient influence the outcome of type II superior labrum anterior and posterior repair?


1 Shoulder and Upper Limb Unit, Epsom & St Helier NHS Trust,Epsom General Hospital, Surrey, UK,
2 New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA,

Correspondence Address:
Daniel Mok
2906 Bank of America Tower, 12 Harcourt Road, Central, Hong Kong

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DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.106223

PMID: 23493640

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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 112-115

 

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Aims: To assess whether patients above 50 years of age, particularly female, would benefit from repair of their SLAP tears. Settings and Design: Review of patients' records followed by telephone interview at a minimum of two years after surgery. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two consecutive patients who had their SLAP repaired were retrospective reviewed by an independent examiner. Follow up was by telephone interview with pain and functional results measured according to the Oxford Shoulder Questionnaire. The patients were asked whether they would undergo the same operation if they had a similar injury. Statistical Analysis Used: OKS - One way ANOVA, followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparisons were used to assess the Oxford Shoulder score. Kruskal-Wallis Test was used to assess the final VAS Pain Score. Student's T tests for Oxford scores before and after surgery. Results: Between 2007-2008, 38 male patients and 34 female patients with an average age of 53 (19-75) years had their SLAP repair. Good to excellent results in Oxford shoulder scores were reported in 94%. 68 0f 72 patients would undergo the same if they had a similar injury. No statistical correlation was found between the patient's age, gender and outcome scores. Conclusions: Neither the patients' gender nor their age above 50 affected the outcome after surgery.






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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




1 Shoulder and Upper Limb Unit, Epsom & St Helier NHS Trust,Epsom General Hospital, Surrey, UK,
2 New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA,

Correspondence Address:
Daniel Mok
2906 Bank of America Tower, 12 Harcourt Road, Central, Hong Kong

Login to access the Email id


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.106223

PMID: 23493640

Get Permissions

Aims: To assess whether patients above 50 years of age, particularly female, would benefit from repair of their SLAP tears. Settings and Design: Review of patients' records followed by telephone interview at a minimum of two years after surgery. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two consecutive patients who had their SLAP repaired were retrospective reviewed by an independent examiner. Follow up was by telephone interview with pain and functional results measured according to the Oxford Shoulder Questionnaire. The patients were asked whether they would undergo the same operation if they had a similar injury. Statistical Analysis Used: OKS - One way ANOVA, followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparisons were used to assess the Oxford Shoulder score. Kruskal-Wallis Test was used to assess the final VAS Pain Score. Student's T tests for Oxford scores before and after surgery. Results: Between 2007-2008, 38 male patients and 34 female patients with an average age of 53 (19-75) years had their SLAP repair. Good to excellent results in Oxford shoulder scores were reported in 94%. 68 0f 72 patients would undergo the same if they had a similar injury. No statistical correlation was found between the patient's age, gender and outcome scores. Conclusions: Neither the patients' gender nor their age above 50 affected the outcome after surgery.






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