Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  
[LN]

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2776    
    Printed196    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded23    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

No correlation between stroke specialty and rate of shoulder pain in NCAA men swimmers


1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, Texas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Lucas Wymore
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, CB# 7055, 3159C Bioinformatics Building, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.102555

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2012  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 71-75

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (1,244 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Purpose: To established an association between shoulder pain and the stroke specialization among NCAA men swimmers. Materials and Methods: All members of the top 25 NCAA men's swim teams were invited to complete the survey. Eleven teams with a total of 187 participants completed the study survey. The teams were mailed surveys that included multiple choice questions regarding their primary stroke and their incidence of shoulder pain. Additionally, the survey included questions about risk factors including distance trained, type of equipment, weight training, and stretching. Results: The analysis showed that there was no significant difference in the rates of shoulder pain among the four strokes and individual medley specialists. The other risk factors did not show a significant correlation with shoulder pain. Conclusions: This study found no significant correlation between stroke specialty and shoulder pain in male collegiate swimmers. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Clinical Relevance: Descriptive epidemiology study.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 


 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, Texas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Lucas Wymore
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, CB# 7055, 3159C Bioinformatics Building, 130 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.102555

Rights and Permissions

Purpose: To established an association between shoulder pain and the stroke specialization among NCAA men swimmers. Materials and Methods: All members of the top 25 NCAA men's swim teams were invited to complete the survey. Eleven teams with a total of 187 participants completed the study survey. The teams were mailed surveys that included multiple choice questions regarding their primary stroke and their incidence of shoulder pain. Additionally, the survey included questions about risk factors including distance trained, type of equipment, weight training, and stretching. Results: The analysis showed that there was no significant difference in the rates of shoulder pain among the four strokes and individual medley specialists. The other risk factors did not show a significant correlation with shoulder pain. Conclusions: This study found no significant correlation between stroke specialty and shoulder pain in male collegiate swimmers. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Clinical Relevance: Descriptive epidemiology study.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article