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Applied sonoanatomy of the posterior triangle of the neck


1 Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
André Pierre Boezaart
Department of Anesthesiology,P.O. Box 100254, Gainesville, Florida, 32610
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.76963

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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 63-74

 

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The posterior triangle of the neck is an area of the body frequently visited by regional anesthesiologists, acute and chronic pain physicians, surgeons of all disciplines, and diagnosticians. It houses the entire brachial plexus from the roots to the divisions, the scalene muscles, the cervical sympathetic ganglions, the major blood vessels to and from the brain, the neuroforamina and various other structures of more or less importance to these physicians. Ultrasound (US) offers a handy visual tool for these structures to be viewed in real time and, therefore, its popularity and the need to understand it. We will discuss pertinent clinical anatomy of the neck and offer a basic visual explanation of the often-difficult two-dimensional (2-D) images seen with US.






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1 Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
André Pierre Boezaart
Department of Anesthesiology,P.O. Box 100254, Gainesville, Florida, 32610
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.76963

Rights and Permissions

The posterior triangle of the neck is an area of the body frequently visited by regional anesthesiologists, acute and chronic pain physicians, surgeons of all disciplines, and diagnosticians. It houses the entire brachial plexus from the roots to the divisions, the scalene muscles, the cervical sympathetic ganglions, the major blood vessels to and from the brain, the neuroforamina and various other structures of more or less importance to these physicians. Ultrasound (US) offers a handy visual tool for these structures to be viewed in real time and, therefore, its popularity and the need to understand it. We will discuss pertinent clinical anatomy of the neck and offer a basic visual explanation of the often-difficult two-dimensional (2-D) images seen with US.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
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