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The long-term efficacy of corticosteroid injection into the acromioclavicular joint using a dynamic fluoroscopic method


1 University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, 5000 Adelaide; Modbury Public Hospital, Smart Road, 5092 Adelaide, Australia
2 Modbury Public Hospital, Smart Road, 5092 Adelaide, Australia; University Hospital Antwerp, Belgium
3 Modbury Public Hospital, Smart Road, 5092 Adelaide, Australia

Correspondence Address:
G I Bain
196, Melbourne Street, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.37112

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Year : 2007  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 104-107

 

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Purpose: Accuracy and efficacy of an intra-articular infiltration of corticosteroid and local anesthetic in the symptomatic acromioclavicular joint were studied in 44 patients. Methods: Accuracy of the infiltration was studied using a blind technique with a dynamic fluoroscopic control. Results: Accuracy of the blind infiltration technique was only 50% and the dynamic fluoroscopic technique remains our preferred technique in the clinical setting. On average patients reported a 65% decrease in the intensity of the pain following the injection. At an average follow-up of forty-two months, 59% had undergone surgery, 14% of patients reported more than three months of symptoms relief. Conclusions: Despite the poor long-term results of injecting the acromioclavicular joint, it remains a valuable technique. It has a low cost, minor risks of complications and has high diagnostic value. All but one patients reporting short-term pain relief. Level of Evidence: Level III, case control study.






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1 University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, 5000 Adelaide; Modbury Public Hospital, Smart Road, 5092 Adelaide, Australia
2 Modbury Public Hospital, Smart Road, 5092 Adelaide, Australia; University Hospital Antwerp, Belgium
3 Modbury Public Hospital, Smart Road, 5092 Adelaide, Australia

Correspondence Address:
G I Bain
196, Melbourne Street, North Adelaide, SA 5006, Australia

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6042.37112

Rights and Permissions

Purpose: Accuracy and efficacy of an intra-articular infiltration of corticosteroid and local anesthetic in the symptomatic acromioclavicular joint were studied in 44 patients. Methods: Accuracy of the infiltration was studied using a blind technique with a dynamic fluoroscopic control. Results: Accuracy of the blind infiltration technique was only 50% and the dynamic fluoroscopic technique remains our preferred technique in the clinical setting. On average patients reported a 65% decrease in the intensity of the pain following the injection. At an average follow-up of forty-two months, 59% had undergone surgery, 14% of patients reported more than three months of symptoms relief. Conclusions: Despite the poor long-term results of injecting the acromioclavicular joint, it remains a valuable technique. It has a low cost, minor risks of complications and has high diagnostic value. All but one patients reporting short-term pain relief. Level of Evidence: Level III, case control study.






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